Linktastic: Stuff that Sucks!


Framing Children’s Deviance
...there is good evidence that people, beginning as children, internalize the stereotypes that others have of them. As Ann Ferguson shows in her book, Bad Boys: Public Schools in the Making of Black Masculinity, black children, especially boys, are stereotyped as pre-criminals; not adorably naughty, like white boys, but dangerously bad from the beginning.

MySpace and Facebook: How Racist Language Frames Social Media (and Why You Should Care)
Every time I dare to talk about race or class and MySpace & Facebook in the same breath, a public explosion happens. This is the current state of things. Unfortunately, most folks who enter the fray prefer to reject the notion that race/class shape social media or that social media reflects bigoted attitudes than seriously address what’s at stake. Yet, look around. Twitter is flush with racist language in response to the active participation of blacks on the site. Comments on YouTube expose deep-seated bigotry in uncountable ways. The n-word is everyday vernacular in MMORPGs. In short, racism and classism permeates every genre of social media out there, reflecting the everyday attitudes of people that go well beyond social media. So why can’t we talk about it?

BP's Dumping Oil-Spill Waste in Communities of Color, Study Finds
More than one hundred days into the BP disaster, folks are wondering where all the oil has gone--much of it seems to have crept under the water's surface, or maybe evaporated into thin air. But, as officials scramble to assess the pending damage, we do know the destination of around 40,000 tons of the spill waste: it's headed for the families that have been getting dumped on for years. In what may be yet another calm before the storm, BP's colorfully advertised waste management plan appears to follow a haunting pattern of environmental racism.

ESPN Announcer To Black NASCAR Crew Member: "Tap Dance For Us"
ESPN Announcer To Black NASCAR Crew Member: "Tap Dance For Us"Continuing the racial insensitivity we've come to expect from ESPN, a race announcer finished an interview this weekend with NASCAR crew member Kenyatta Houston — who is black — by asking him to "tap for us" before the race. Seriously.